FLOWER ANALYSIS

Flower #1

This flower was found at Glen Echo Park, in a riparian habitat along a creek.

This is on page 104 in Peterson’s Wildflowers

Common name: Pale Jewelweed

Scientific name: Impatiens pallida

Corolla: number of petals 5, fused

Calyx: number of sepals 3, separate

Androecium: number of stamens 5, fused around the pistil.

Gynoecium type: Syncarpous with two carpels
This was difficult to tell on the cross section but appears to have two chambers.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: Zygomorphic

Additional distinctive features: This plant is also known as the touch-me-not, due to the explosive seed pods upon contact. These seed pods aerially shoot the seeds out as the pod curls up.

 

Flower #2

This flower was found at Glen Echo Park at the base of a creek bed, a riparian habitat:

It is on page 316 in Peterson’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Great Blue Lobelia

Scientific name: Lobelia siphilitica 

Corolla: number of petals 5‚ fused

Calyx: number of sepals 5, fused

Androecium: number of stamens 5, fused, arranged centrally around ovary

Gynoecium type: Syncarpous with 2 carpels
How can you tell? A cross section shows two C-shaped chambers in the ovary that appear separate.

Flower type/ovary position: Epigynous

Flower symmetry: Zygomorphic

Additional distinctive features: The petals of Great Blue Lobelia are fused into two distinct sections, with two on the top and three on the bottom to act as a landing pad for pollinators.

Flower #3

This flower was found along Indianola Avenue in a dry garden bed, with direct sunlight:

It is on page 102 in Peterson’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Yellow Daylily

Scientific name: Hemerocallis lilioasphodelus

Corolla: number of petals- 3‚ separate

Calyx:  ‚ number of sepals- 3, separate

Androecium: number of stamens- 6, separate with four tall and two shorter stamens.

Gynoecium type: Syncarpous, with three carpels
How can you tell? Cutting open the pistil revealed three apparent chambers within the flower.

Flower type/ovary position: Perigynous

Flower symmetry: Actinomorphic

Additional distinctive features: The yellow daylily seems to have six petals, but the back three turned out to be the sepals. Unlike other species of yellow lilies, this flower is entirely yellow, including reproductive parts. 

Flower #4

This flower was found along Hudson Avenue in a dry but shaded flower box:

It is on page 334 in Peterson’s Wildflowers.

Common name True Forget-me-nots

Scientific name: Myosotis scorpioides

Corolla: number of petals 5, separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5, separate

Androecium: number of stamens 5, fused

Gynoecium type: Syncarpous, with 5 carpels
This was too small to get a good visual of, but a microscopic image online shows five chambers.

Flower type/ovary position: Epigynous

Flower symmetry: Zygomorphic

Additional distinctive features: Forget-me-nots contain a feature called the fornice, which is the thick ring around the center of the flower. This acts as a cushion during pollination.

Flower #5

Location and Habitat: Glen Echo Park, along the creek bed in riparian habitat.

Common Name: Wingstem

Scientific Name: Verbesina alternifolia

Distinctive Features: The distinctive stem has vertical ridges described as wings. The petals droop easily and vary in numbers, with small disk flowers in the center.

Fun Fact: This plant is recognized by pollination ecologists for its ability to attract high numbers of native bee species.

Flower #6

Location and Habitat: Glen Echo Park near the creek bed, wet riparian area.

Common Name: Rough-leaved Goldenrod

Scientific Name: Solidago patula

Distinctive Features: Large, jagged lower leaves, with smaller leaves underneath each branching off axillary.

Fun Fact: Very similar to other goldenrod species, the elm-branch and zigzag species of goldenrod are more likely to hybridize than other goldenrod species.

Flower #7

Location and Habitat: Glen Echo Park, dryer rocky field habitat.

Common Name: Large Houstonia

Scientific Name: Houstonia purpuria

Distinctive Features: This flower is three-veined with leaves growing in sets of two.

Fun Fact: The common name for this wildflower is Venus’s Pride.

Flower #8

Location and Habitat: Glen Echo Park, dry and rocky field habitat.

Common Name: Ground Ivy

Scientific Name: Glechoma hederacea

Distinctive Features: This plant grows more horizontally than vertically over the ground. The flower consists of five petals, with two fused on the top and three fused on the bottom.

Fun Fact: This plant was introduced to America through early European settlers, who thought the plant would make good ground cover in the shade.